The Altered Echo Project Presents…
AEP012: Roo Stercogburn – Feature 5

Out Now

Spawned from 11 single artist releases, 5 mutated works, and 40+ gigs of samples Roo Stercogburn borrows a piece or two from it all and re-purposes it into a summer release that will leave you wondering just how the hell did he did it.

As with all of our previous releases we are thrilled to provide a custom sample pack containing stems and samples of handmade sounds for your creative needs as compiled by Stercogburn himself.

For a free direct download of this additional content please…

CLICK HERE

Use them, abuse them, do with them what you will. It is our hope however that you will use this additional content as inspiration for new works spawned from the old to be submitted back to us for possible publication via this project.

All tracks mixed & composed by Roo Stercogburn
Mastering by Benwaa: benwaa@benwaa.com
Artwork by Scyn
Published by Aaron Smith and Rick Jeldy via the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution License


Notes on the Work From the Artist

In the tracks I’ve presented, there are a mixture of AEP sample packs and my own sounds of course. I’ve pretty much stuck to what I wrote above – only sounds I could retune or use as percussion or FX have been used. If it had a strong tune, I didn’t use it.

The retuning was done using Melodyne and was a lot of fun. I’d take random segments and just carve up blocks and send them to a particular note or other, then revise the melody until I liked it. A large number of tracks within the songs I’ve put out here are simply the AEP sound banks, put through Melodyne and a variety of FX, mainly Guitar Rig 5, biFilter and RC24, aside from the usual EQ work, which is almost entirely the built-in EQ in Cakewalk Sonar Platinum.

Similarly, I used Melodyne on percussive sounds – I took some percussion elements from the sample packs and didn’t even bother to change the speed of the samples – just cut them up into blocks in Melodyne then quantized them. This gave the revised percussion swing by dint of actually being out of time within a block, but kept it in time overall because I had quantized all the blocks I made. I cannot overstate how much fun this was to do.

Very. Cool. Fun.

Samples n’ Such

The goody bag I’ve put together is mostly a selection of the sounds I made myself, there’s only a few that are altered sounds from previous AEP contributors and those I only included where I had made significant changes to the sound because I thought it might be fun for others to play with. If there’s anything you’d like from the goody bag that I haven’t included, let me know and I’ll see about making it available.

Thanks to the AEP guys for taking this on. Thanks to Ben Waa for some great mastering, which gave me what I wanted: dynamics, dirt and warmth. Thanks to Scyn for allowing me to use his wonderful artwork for the cover.

The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank Stercogburn for providing us with this fabulous material, and Ben Waa for the AMAZING masters. We’d also like to thank YOU the listener for checking out the project and participating in what we have created.

AEP-

DotCom
SoundCloud
BandCamp
FaceBook

The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.
-Tim

“Patience Rewarded” Mutation by Kneedless

Please check out this brand new mutation of Stem Collector’s title track from the Patience Reward EP by Kneedless called “Patience Rewarded”

About Kneedless:

Tunesmiths have been building music from found objects since the beginning of time. In October 2011 Kneedless began practicing the art of smithing tunes, he has been transmuting a multitude of instruments and objects from the physical and digital realm into tunes that are in a realm of their own, he often sets a mission or limitation for each track (eg: use nothing but 1 guitar and amp to make an entire composition, record a track in the kitchen, remix a track without listening to the original) this leads to a broad variety in his music. Kneedless resides in Melbourne and you may find him playing at the odd festival around Australia, or just running around with some ridiculous home made contraption.

https://soundcloud.com/ kneedless

Download Kneedless’s Stems Here

The Altered Echo Project
AEP012: Roo Stercogburn – Feature 5

Out 28 July, 2015

From 11 single artist releases, 5 mutated works, and 20+ gigs of samples Roo Stercogburn borrows a piece or two from it all and re-purposes it into a summer release that will leave you wondering just how the hell did he did it.

Stercogburn Writes – Remixing Sucks

Hi all,

Lets get something clear before I go much further. I have shamelessly cheated on this.
I hate remixing with a passion, I almost never do it. My joy tends to come from composition and seeing nothing turned into something, not recycling the work of others. I know I know, remixing is a completely legitimate passtime / profit-making venture, its just not something I enjoy so historically I have stayed away from it. The AEP project has been going awhile and I’ve tended to keep away, even though the stuff coming out of the AEP project is good.

Except When it Doesn’t

I had a bit of a lightbulb moment which changed some of that. I had a listen to some of the sample packs previous projects have made available and that I could get around my disinterest by doing two things:

1) Mainly use percussive or FX sounds from the previous projects.
2) Retune the sounds utterly to fit whatever melody I wanted.

So basically I changed the game for me from remixing others’ work, to just using them as a kind of tuneless sample pack which would be a nice springboard for my own ideas.

Notes on the Work

In the tracks I’ve presented, there are a mixture of AEP sample packs and my own sounds of course. I’ve pretty much stuck to what I wrote above – only sounds I could retune or use as percussion or FX have been used. If it had a strong tune, I didn’t use it.

The retuning was done using Melodyne and was a lot of fun. I’d take random segments and just carve up blocks and send them to a particular note or other, then revise the melody until I liked it. A large number of tracks within the songs I’ve put out here are simply the AEP sound banks, put through Melodyne and a variety of FX, mainly Guitar Rig 5, biFilter and RC24, aside from the usual EQ work, which is almost entirely the built-in EQ in Cakewalk Sonar Platinum.

Similarly, I used Melodyne on percussive sounds – I took some percussion elements from the sample packs and didn’t even bother to change the speed of the samples – just cut them up into blocks in Melodyne then quantized them. This gave the revised percussion swing by dint of actually being out of time within a block, but kept it in time overall because I had quantized all the blocks I made. I cannot overstate how much fun this was to do.

Very. Cool. Fun.

Things that I remember, since I did all these tracks some months ago:

In ‘Around’, the high pitched background noise behind the vocals “I’m just looking around” is an AEP sample thats been completely retuned. It is not perfectly retuned, that would be too nice. We want nice? Hell no. Its only partially retuned in that most of the notes are moved to be in tune but segments have been left many cents out to give that detuned effect without which the sound itself would be, well, a bit shit.

The bassline in SBD is a Pro 2 arp with no processing other than a teeny bit of EQ. Ben’s mastering really brought out the awesome in the sound.

Thanks to the AEP guys for taking this on. Thanks to Ben Waa for some great mastering, which gave me what I wanted: dynamics, dirt and warmth. Thanks to Scyn for allowing me to use his wonderful artwork for the cover.

Samples n’ Such

The goody bag I’ve put together is mostly a selection of the sounds I made myself, there’s only a few that are altered sounds from previous AEP contributors and those I only included where I had made significant changes to the sound because I thought it might be fun for others to play with. If there’s anything you’d like from the goody bag that I haven’t included, let me know and I’ll see about making it available.

Preview – Racked

Tracklisting –

1. Around
2. Framed by the Sun and Moon
3. Racked
4. SBD

All tracks mixed & composed by Roo Stercogburn
Mastering by Benwaa: benwaa@benwaa.com
Artwork by Scyn
Published by Aaron Smith and Rick Jeldy via the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution License

The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank Stercogburn for providing us with this fabulous material, and Benwaa for the AMAZING masters. We’d also like to thankYOU the listener for checking out the project and participating in what we have created.

AEP-

DotCom
SoundCloud
BandCamp
FaceBook

The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.
-Tim

The Altered Echo Project
AEP8.1: Ambient Mechanics – The Tide – Tidal Remixes

Out Now

In the five months since our last release Aaron and I have decided to take our experiment in sound to it’s next level. The idea behind The Altered Echo Project from day one has been, in essence, a foray into the world of audio manipulation and the recreation of sound. An artist creates something unique which then gets picked up by another who expands upon the original and makes the vision one of their own. In honor of ushering in Phase II of the project a change has occurred in one of our previous releases.

Our twelfth offering in the AEP catalog brings you a complete reinterpretation of AEP008: The Tide – Tidal and in doing so brings us one step closer to a self perpetuating catalog heavily entrenched in it’s own heritage.

All tracks mixed & composed by Ambient Mechanics
Mastering and Artwork by Mike Watts
Published by Aaron Smith and Rick Jeldy via the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution License


Stems, Samples, and Midi…

As with our previous releases, AM has provided extra insight, in the form of a sample pack with the EP deconstructed into separate audio and midi files for all your remix needs. Use them, abuse them, do with what you will. It is our hope however that you, our listener turned artist, will find inspiration in what you hear and submit new works spawned from the old, back to us for possible republication through this project.

Clicking this block of text will activate an immediate download of nearly one gig of stems, samples, and MIDI data.

On the Horizon…

Be on the lookout for information on open submission periods, VA compilations, sonic annihilation and much much more, as AEP takes the year 2015 by storm.

The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank AM for providing us with this fabulous material, and Mike Watts for the AMAZING masters and source material. We’d also like to thank YOU the listener for checking out the project and participating in what we have created.

AM –
DotCom
SoundCloud
Band Camp

AEP-
DotCom
SoundCloud
BandCamp
FaceBook

The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.
-Tim

The Altered Echo Project
AEP8.1: Ambient Mechanics – The Tide – Tidal Mutation

A Change Has Occured…

In the five months since our last release Aaron and I have decided to take our experiment in sound to it’s next level. The idea behind The Altered Echo Project from day one has been, in essence, a foray into the world of audio manipulation and the recreation of sound. An artist creates something unique which then gets picked up by another who expands upon the original and makes the vision one of their own. In honor of ushering in Phase II of the project a change has occurred in one of our previous releases.

Our twelfth offering in the AEP catalog brings you a complete reinterpretation of AEP008: The Tide – Tidal and in doing so brings us one step closer to a self perpetuating catalog heavily entrenched in it’s own heritage. From this day forth, in accordance with Phase II, the Altered Echo Project will only be accepting works which employ heavy use of our in-house sound library, or, works that are direct mutations of previously released material. In honor of this, bringing a stunning collection of works just as unique as their originals, The Altered Echo Project is pleased to announce…

Ambient Mechanics – The Tide – Tidal Remixes

Out 24 March, 2015

Preview – Ultima Thule

Tracklisting –

1. Ara Borealis

2. City By The Sea

3. A Dark Blue Sky

4. Ultima Thule

5. When The Sun Returns

6. Tidal

All tracks mixed & composed by Ambient Mechanics
Mastering and Artwork by Mike Watts
Published by Aaron Smith and Rick Jeldy via the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution License


Stems, Samples, and Midi…

As with our previous releases, AM will provide extra insight, in the form of a sample pack with the EP deconstructed into separate audio and midi files for all your remix needs. Use them, abuse them, do with what you will. It is our hope however that you, our listener turned artist, will find inspiration in what you hear and submit new works spawned from the old, back to us for possible republication through this project.

On the Horizon…

Be on the lookout for information on open submission periods, VA compilations, sonic annihilation and much much more, as AEP takes the year 2015 by storm.

The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank AM for providing us with this fabulous material, and  Mike Watts for the AMAZING masters and source material. We’d also like to thank YOU the listener for checking out the project and participating in what we have created.

AM –

SoundCloud

Band Camp

AEP-

DotCom

SoundCloud

BandCamp

FaceBook

The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.
-Tim

AE

The Altered Echo Project
AEP8.1: Ambient Mechanics – The Tide – Tidal Remixes

A Change Has Occured…

In the five months since our last release Aaron and I have decided to take our experiment in sound to it’s next level. The idea behind The Altered Echo Project from day one has been, in essence, a foray into the world of audio manipulation and the recreation of sound. An artist creates something unique which then gets picked up by another who expands upon the original and makes the vision one of their own. In honor of ushering in Phase II of the project a change has occurred in one of our previous releases.

Our twelfth offering in the AEP catalog brings you a complete reinterpretation of AEP008: The Tide – Tidal and in doing so brings us one step closer to a self perpetuating catalog heavily entrenched in it’s own heritage. From this day forth, in accordance with Phase II, the Altered Echo Project will only be accepting works which employ heavy use of our in-house sound library, or, works that are direct mutations of previously released material. In honor of this, bringing a stunning collection of works just as unique as their originals, The Altered Echo Project is pleased to announce…

Ambient Mechanics – The Tide – Tidal Remixes

Out 24 March, 2015

Preview – Ultima Thule

Tracklisting –

1. Ara Borealis

2. City By The Sea

3. A Dark Blue Sky

4. Ultima Thule

5. When The Sun Returns

6. Tidal

All tracks mixed & composed by Ambient Mechanics
Mastering and Artwork by Mike Watts
Published by Aaron Smith and Rick Jeldy via the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution License


Stems, Samples, and Midi…

As with our previous releases, AM will provide extra insight, in the form of a sample pack with the EP deconstructed into separate audio and midi files for all your remix needs. Use them, abuse them, do with what you will. It is our hope however that you, our listener turned artist, will find inspiration in what you hear and submit new works spawned from the old, back to us for possible republication through this project.

On the Horizon…

Be on the lookout for information on open submission periods, VA compilations, sonic annihilation and much much more, as AEP takes the year 2015 by storm.

The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank AM for providing us with this fabulous material, and  Mike Watts for the AMAZING masters and source material. We’d also like to thank YOU the listener for checking out the project and participating in what we have created.

AM –

SoundCloud

Band Camp

AEP-

DotCom

SoundCloud

BandCamp

FaceBook

The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.
-Tim

AE

P72CoverPhomorian’s newest EP – Desensitization Reassociation as released by BFW Recordings – grabbed my attention on a social media feed just shortly after it’s release. Phomorian, for those that don’t know, is one of the top players here in our game we call The Altered Echo Project. Based upon his previous output with us – Grain Bastard Mutation & A Sum of the Product – as soon as I saw his newest EP hit the proverbial shelf I knew it was a recording that would be far more worthy than a simple click of the play button in my spare time.

If there was one thing I knew about Phomorian, prior to hearing this release, it was that his tracks possess a quality that blurs the line between beauty and chaos. Desensitization Reassociation is no exception to this rule, and is an album that quite expertly expands upon it. The tracks that he has released via AEP and the tracks on his new EP have a way of leaving me scratching my head in a how’d he do that kind of way so I was thrilled when Phomorian agreed to do this interview. If you have yet to listen to this wonderful release hit play below as you sit back and read. Shedding an all new light on his most recent album from technical details, to ethos, and many things in between Aaron and I are honored to present, one of AEP’s own, Phomorian…

One striking quality about this record is contrast. The tracks have a way of going from ambient to neuro at a moments notice with various elements unifying the two worlds in a very logical way. Was the melding of these two worlds something you found to come natural to you or was it a thing born out of focused practice? Do you have any tips for our readers on how to transition from something more ambient and esoteric to in your face neuro within the same piece of music?

Rather than intentional it is something that I can’t avoid. I started listening to ambient/drone style about a year ago and I was influenced by it, but when I tried to make music in that way I was instinctively dragged to a part where the beat comes on.I have to recognize that I was jealous when hearing to other artists, holding that “ethereal feel” without the need of braking it, but it is probably because the way I understand music; a soft part to introduce the piece helps the listener to get into the mood and also makes the sensation of the track much bigger, as a history told from the very beginning that displays the origin of the factors involved on it. This sort of non rhythmic intro happens in the Hindustani music and many other traditions.
As a tip to others there’s nothing new I can tell, listen music -wich is the biggest source of ideas- and practice, don’t be afraid of copying and stealing to integrate those ideas until you find your own ways.
I like the album and each track as a whole. For my tastes though my favorite parts of the record come from the more ambient side of things. Do you find one aspect easier than the other, the ambient vs the, what I’m calling, neuro type twisted bass type stuff? If so why?
I find harder the “neuro type” parts, probably because there are more elements involved, also the mix of those parts gets more difficult until you get a sound where more or less everything can be heard with clarity.
Lets talk about that twisted bass for a min. How do you arrive at these type sounds? Is it by selection or design? Take us through your process in bass design and your method of making it twist and turn in the way you do?
I am relatively new on synthesis. I used to choose presets and modify them slightly until a student from a course of production which I was imparting said he preferred to make his own sounds, because having to choose between hundreds of presets made fun disappear. At that point it was when I started making my own sounds and discovered that these (may not as spectacular as the ones in the list of presets) fit much better with the track … and were also mine, original and made the production process more craft and entertaining. In tracks 1, 2 and 4 the bass sound is made with Massive, I started following a tutorial by Anodyne Industries that I find in IDMforums, with two LFOs affecting the filter and other one inversely affecting the amount of those firsts, the only trick is maybe assign a different length to each LFO rate so the sound will be changing for longer. I mean, if one LFO is set to 5 eighths and other is set in 7 eighths, the result will be a cycle of 35 eighths of a changing sound.
The sound in track 3 is generated by two Operators, trying first to get a rich harmonic source with a deep bass at the same time, and then processed in parallel thru a rack of filters and EQs with the frequency controlled by the same macro, but with different amounts and sometimes conversely. So with only one knob (or automation line) many notch and bandpass filters moves around generating interesting modulations.
The bass in track 5 was made by a different way, by resampling, this is something I should do more often instead of keeping the midi tracks always running. So basically I converted the midi to audio, after made several versions of it by processed with different effects, reversing etc, and finally making a collage layering those processed audios with the original.
There’s a multiband processing for all the basses of the EP. Nothing really new, the low band in mono, with a compressor that side chains to the kick to avoid phase cancellation; in the mid sometimes distortion and the high sometimes with a little amount of a short reverb to make it more spacey.
Like I said my favorite parts of the album come from the ambiance combined with the ever present glitch. Listening to the record from that point of view, studying the chord structures and progressions, leads one to believe that you might perhaps be classically trained, or at least know a fair amount of theory. First off is this the case? What steps did you take to learn it? How important is it, do you think, to learn theory if you’re wanting to make electronic music and how far does one need to go.
Guess it’s not a very common story, at the age of 18 (I was already playing electric guitar, bass and drums with several bands) when I took LSD for the first time with my father, we are talking about a major dose. This opened the perception to a variety of musical styles that until then I was indifferent, as the aforementioned Hindustani, which is really psychedelic. It was a fundamental part of my way to understand and feel the music, and I consider part of my musical education, but not theoretical. Actually music is my Day Job – not the electronic one. I had some classical formation at the Spanish Conservatory (only for 5 years) and also learned outside it because for the last 20 years approx. I’ve been playing with several bands, making music for theatre, video, apps and also working as sound engineer at the studio etc… This said, harmony is by far my weakest composing skill.
I don´t really think that theory is an essential requirement for making music, but it helps, as any kind of musical knowledge or resources that will feed your creations.
There’s only two essential requirements to make music (any kind) decently I think, instinct and training, so if if you have a great musical instinct but you don’t work to develop it your compositions probably won’t be mature or relevant; and if you don’t have some instinct or any kind of creativity or any musical sense (if only a little) doesn’t matter how much you practice. Those requirements are also applicable to the fact of playing an instrument.
In my opinion the singularity needed for being an electronic musician (unlike other genres) is to be half musician and half sound engineer, because the sound desing / mix / etc is a very relevant part of the composition itself.
Staying in line with the previous question what is your strategy for composing a chord progression? Are you doing it by ear in a trial and error type way or do you already have some sort of idea what the chord progressions and shapes are going to be before you put pen to paper or midi to DAW?
I don´t really know… most of the times when I make music (any kind) I don’t have a plan, don’t know what is going to happen next… I just build on the fly.  I may have some resources, such as moving towards the relative minor etc, but basically I write chords that give me the sensation that I seek. If one of them does not provide me the desired feeling I change it.
There is a similar feel to all these questions just applied to different aspects of production. In light of that talk to us about your process for arriving at your pad sounds. Some artists have specific techniques they revisit and modify for various applications and tracks others arrive at a sound by fiddling. Whatever yours happens to be it makes no matter because it works really well but what is your overall method, ethos, what have you, when it comes to designing sound.
When it comes to atmospheric sounds I have no method, I do is listen and add sounds to cover the spectrum, amplitude, texture (I like to use granular synthesis for this), depth. etc.. adding a background of random noises works fine also. Something I’ve learned from others is to restrict the stereo image… if everyone is fully open I do not like the result, so I try to set different ranges for a more three-dimensional perspective.
What I’m most interested in learning from you via this conversation is…the glitch. I recently saw you speaking to Jazzyspoon about a Reaktor patch that you used in some capacity in making the drums what they are in this release. Explain to us what that patch / device / ensemble is and what it does. How heavily was this used in the release? Are you relying solely on the output of devices of this nature or are there some manual edits going on as well with the audio files? How much time, after the bare bones drum track is composed are you spending in edits and glitching of the file?
The reaktor ensemble that you’re talking about is a combination by Jazzyspoon that I used in the last track of the EP, made with Spiral and Acid Rex , the later is a loop player with multiple effects that are switched by the incoming midi notes, and the first is a note generator, so what it does is to play a loop with changing effect giving it a constant glitchy variation. Instead of using it as a loop player I used to process the output of one of the drum kits (there were six in that track), then I changed the density of glitches by automating the speed of Spiral. What I do more often for similar purposes is to use a set of tracks in serial, each track has an effect with the parameters automated always changing, so the audio pass thru the first to the second and so on. After this serial process it could be drastically deformed. Then (again with automation) I send alternatively the signal of different elements, so sometimes is processing a drum line, after the bass, after nothing etc. It is a very simple way to get aberrant results.
Usually I build the biggest part of my tracks in one day but then I can spend weeks arranging, modifying automation and mixing.
I’ve noticed from watching you on-line that you use Ableton Live. Talk to us about in-built live devices that you are using to effect percussion. Max4live is a similar tool to the one mentioned in the previous question, Reaktor. Are you incorporating MAX for any of your glitch effects or randomized things that are going on within the percussion in this release? If so what patches are you using? Do you build your own either within Reaktor or MAX? I guess what I’m really asking here is…when it comes to glitch what’s your secret?
In my opinion the goal of Ableton Live (in which I am relatively new) is the modularity (opposed to the internal latency correction engine, wich is a mess) so with simple blocks a very complex device can be constructed. I like randomness, I can see the beauty in the small changes and I always try to escape from the repetitions; like in the sounds of the everyday life. If you heard the traffic for example, it is apparently a constant noise but indeed it’s always different. But when you have a piece where the rhythm of every line is random there’s a leak in the sense of unity, so it doesn’t work (unless is that un-united feel what you’re looking for).
So I’ve been experimenting to get a method where all the track is affected by the same random facts and a way to be able to modify different aspects of the randomization itself. Is what I call with my friends “controlled randomization”.The way I do is to process a very simple midi line with arpeggiators and/or midi echoes to make it more complex, doing it in parallel so I get two lines, one that I call “NORMAL” and like an answer to that one that I call “CONTRA” trying to adjust the arps/delays to get as result a two rhythmic patterns that sounds interesting when played at the same time. This way we have one variation of the rhythm, but more are needed…so I finally made ten ones, organized in two sets of five each in semi serial mode. After some experimentation I ended up using midi velocity to lead the incoming notes to any of the 10 different processing possibilities. With Ableton’s Velocity plugin I do so. First in the chain randomizing all velocities and after using the plugin as a velocity gate with a knob controlling the “lowest” or “range” parameter of several instances of it. The result is a machine with 19 racks (inside each other) about 20 Velocity plugins and many-many arps and echos (that I modify for each piece).
This device is controlled by eight knobs and the crossfade, the latter set the amount of notes that will go to one of the two sets of five variations or to the other one, and the knobs determine the amount of notes that (once they entered in any of those sets) is processed by an arp/echo or pass to the next… so if the first knob of a set is at maximum value then the first arp will process all the incoming midi notes; the more it goes to minimum more notes will continue to the next and so on.This midi processor can be used not only for drums, any sliced material, like a bass stem or whatever, can be feeded with it (with the NORMAL output, the CONTRA or both) wich makes it a great tool for remixing, also giving the chance to modify the groove/feel/rhythm of many elements at once. It can also generate like morphing effects in rhythm etc. I’ve used it in all the tracks except “Cosmic”. In Max4live or Reaktor I only use devices created by others, a similar device could be built with any of them but I have no skills to do it.
Talk to us about your label BFW Recordings. How did you meet the guys over there? Why did you select them to represent your material? What was the process from demo submission to release like with them? The internet is highly saturated with all manner of artist representation. In light of that, what do you think are their strengths and what can they offer an artist over the rest of the heap?
I found BFW Recordings surfing the web looking for IDM netlabels, I submitted my material to a few but they were the only ones that gave me an answer. Electronic music has been my passion for many years, but I never released any tracks officially until the “Grain Bastard Mutation” and “A Sum of the Product”, both with AEP, at that time I realized how positive this could be, it’s not only the fact that your music can be heard by others and the feedback you get (this is probably more like an ego thing) in my case is a question of motivation, having a deadline or a purposeful pushes me to finalize the tracks. These ones have been in a dead point for months till I received the answer by BFW in January.
Critiquing your own work can be a nearly impossible thing to do but talk to us about your honest thoughts on this release. Is there anything you would have done differently? What about the album to you stands out the most? How long did it take you to make? Do you have a favorite track? And finally…What’s next up on your agenda? Are you just going to bask in the afterglow of this release for a while or are you already planning the next one?
I’m pretty satisfied with the release, I wouldn’t change nothing relevant on it. Started some of these tracks in february of 2014 so the whole process took like a year and my favourite tracks are “Blurred Landscape” and “Cosmic”. Releasing this has reactivated me so I’m working in new tracks and planning another EP… but in doubt if a glitchy dubstep or idm-breakcore one.
—-
As the other half of the Altered Echo Project I’d like to extend the gratitude of both Aaron and myself to Phomorian for taking time out of his life to do this interview for us. Aaron and I would also like to extend out thanks to the folks at BFW Recordings for letting us participate in the release in this way. All applicable links and contacts can be found below… 
 Phomorian
BFW Recordings
AEP
——–
The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.

-Tim

AE
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