a0079059577_2Proton42 is an artist who is as creative as he is unique. One quick listen through his most recent Pegasia Music release “Fallacracy” proves that electronic music can be truly emotive even in the absence of lyrical content that dictates to the listener what those emotions are to be.

It’s a record that will remind you of your youth, holds a strong presence in the things of today, while looking forward to the influences of tomorrow. With little regard for musical norms, it’s an album that holds up, and an album that promises to remain current should you happen to revisit it years down-line.

Proton42 has been kind enough to give our readers a bit of insight into what’s driving this record, from technical details, to ethos, and many things in between. If you have yet to listen to this wonderful release please hit the play  button below as you sit back and read. Shedding an all new light on his most recent album, and the 33rd in the Pegasia Music Catalog - AEP is honored to give you Proton42…

The album is unabashedly electronic in a very good way. In an independent electronic music world that is increasingly moving towards organic type sounds, field recordings both manipulated and not, sampling and the like, Fallacracy seems to take a strong electronic position. Was this intentional, and if so, why?

 I think it’s more of a subconscious decision than a purely intentional one, but there are a handful of definite reasons for sticking to raw electronic tonal qualities. I’d say reason number one is the huge amount of influence I took from early video game music and toy piano keyboards in my youth, and the concept of attempting to reproduce natural acoustics with very basic means. Another big reason for this can be attributed directly to the low budget of my sudio, working with freeware VST and replications of old gaming console chips, and not wanting to put out more organic works if they can’t be as pristine as possible. That said, I don’t think the purely electronic means is going to be a habit with me, just a current reality.
 
The album very much feels like a single unit as opposed to eight random tracks composed over time then thrown together for a release. Take us through your process of composing an album vs. composing a one off. Are you making the tracks with the larger vision in mind, or do you just have a developed sound at which you usually arrive no matter what you are composing for, be it a collection of works or a single track?
 
Yeah, this was a very different and much needed change of approach for me. It’s definitely a combination of both working to achieve a larger vision and developing a collection of techniques that I have become comfortable with over the years. For a really long time I would just sit down and program one-offs, but they don’t always compliment each other in an album setting, and sitting down to program a piece of music is very different than sitting down in front of a piano and letting performance of the instrument offer it’s own technique. Even so, I could use the same techniques and arrive at different places with them. I think what keeps this album together is sticking to certain devices and VST, not going overboard with the technologies and with such drastic differences.
 
You recently said; “I hope the album can invoke unique hidden emotion in people…”  Are there key elements within your tracks that you go to, to give Fallacracy it’s emotive feel? If so what are they? If not just feel free to simply elaborate on the quote there.
 

This is definitely more of a reactionary response to an issue I have with lots of popular music today and it’s emotional intentions, and maybe it’s just me being anti-pop and not having traditional values. I just feel that music today plays on the emotions of the consumer rather than the emotions of the artist. We can all generally assume that the listener could be in a mood to listen to something happy, or angry, or sad. Where is the wonder and excitement in playing on the simplest of emotions, where has the adventure of questioning our deeper feelings gone? I don’t want people to continue feeling their own happiness, or sadness, or anger, I want the listener to step out of their skin and feel the mystery, hope, excitement of the unknown, and resolve that I do. I want to compose music that invokes something other than the simplest of emotions, because our brains are capable of so much more than basic thought.

 My favorite tracks off the album are “Weeks End” and the title track “Fallacracy.” Much of this record sounds like something that should live in both todays world and 1988 at the same time. Talk to us about influence. What music from then [if any] and now are you most  taking influence from, and what were you primarily listening to while making this record?
 
Well without too much name dropping and to get the question of current influences and what I am listening to at the time out of the way I’ve been heavily digging into WARP, Ghostly, Metropolis and i, absentee records. There is just some kind of powerful deeper emotion and philosophy going on with the artists who choose these labels, without getting too deep into the sea of microgenres we’ve created for ourselves in the electronic music world.
As for music of the past, video games had far too much of an influence on me. Video game music exists in this strange realm where the intent is to create more than one singular emotion for every unique event that happens in a game’s story, just as I want to explore deeper the emotions we experience through music. Popular music of the 60’s-80’s was also in a kind of flux where people could get away with just about any form of deepness or strangeness and I really respected a lot of psychedelic and new wave electronic artists telling stories and provoking thought.
 
The album feels very fluid and lose in a very relaxed and nice way. How did you compose this? Are you sequencing notes or playing them by hand? What’s your strategy for coming up with melody? 
 
This album was very unique for me in that I was more concerned with getting the melodies and composition out in a live setting as opposed to sitting down and sequencing the whole thing. It’s very frustrating when you sequence a piece of music that you want to jam to and ends up being too technically advanced to play. I also feel like playing an instrument lends itself to a different process of thought and different technique. The visual aspect of pattern recognition and piano playing is just more comfortable for the mind than plucking out each note of a chord on the computer keyboard. There is still a lot of sequencing in terms of the drums and some minor harmonic flair.
 
Lets talk about drums. I love the drum sequencing and drum design in this record. Do you arrive at your drum sounds via design, selection, or a combination of both? Tell us as much about composing and sequencing a drum track as you’d like because the drums on this record really shine. 
 
The percussions on this album are a mixture of loops and sequenced VST based hits, heavily processed. Outside of the processing I’ve done, I can’t claim responsibility for the design of a lot of these percussions, most of the loops came with a version of cakewalk sonar packaged with my audio device, and a lot of the one-shots are from psychic modulation VST. So, in answer to your question it all falls down to selection first, and then processing to compliment the synthesis.
 
Moving onto synths and sounds, the next question is the same as the last really. Do you arrive at your sounds via design, selection, or both? Are there specific synths that you go to for specific tasks? The sound design on the record is not only unique but listenable, cohesive, and very solid. That said please take us through your process, methodology, and ethos as related to sound making. 
 
The synthesis is very special to me, I feel the melodic instruments have the most power in a piece of music. It’s hard to explain in depth where I start here because a lot of the time it is so simple, I find simplicity works best and allows the brain to focus easier than having to parse all sorts of complexity.
Usually I will load up a VST and have a listen to some key presets. Once I find one I like, I will pull out the piano and start jamming out some melody that utilizes the preset’s range. Once I am happy with the melody, I will begin to alter the preset tonally and apply automation or side chain certain parameters.
The idea is to make sure the tone is unrecognizable as the preset it was but contains the tonal qualities I was looking for to begin with. Then, I will process the percussions to compliment the instrumentation, and I will keep altering the instrumentation to further compliment the percussions.
Sometimes I do know exactly what tone I am looking for and design it from scratch, sometimes it is warranted and sometimes you just need a good push in the right direction altering a preset you enjoy. Everything about the quality of the design has to do with the effects chains I create for them after the fact and how I decide to mix it all together.
 
How long did the album take you to make, and when you sat down to make the first track were you planning on making an album? Was the first track you made track one on the record, or were they made in a different order than what we hear on the album? Do you have a favorite? Any significance to the track titles? 
 

It couldn’t have taken me longer than four months, (I really don’t document that sort of thing) mostly because I was so dead set on creating something more than a handful of singles that I would throw on an album. I already had a pretty solid plan of what I was trying to acheive and just dove right into it. The tracks didn’t develop in the same order they appear on the album, but they all developed at the same time we will say. A lot of getting all of the tracks to compliment each other was a labor of many alterations of every mix. Say the bass is too loud in 3 of the 8 tracks, I will edit those 3 and leave the rest. Then for instance the pads are too loud in 5 of the 8, I will go in and clean them all up at the same time. Sometimes I will add more when I go in to the mixes, if they felt flat compared to the other tunes. This whole project was an experience in balance for me and I couldn’t treat each mix as individually as I was used to, they all needed to have the same qualities and genetics.The track titles? Nebulous really. Some of them were suggestions from friends, some were more apparent from composition (such as Vertical Dive), Seetle was conceived when I was visiting Seattle and is something of a Tim and Eric reference, inside jokes, that sort of thing.

You have released with Pegasia Music before, yes? Besides being ran by the notorious Mr. Ben Steed any particular reason you decided to have them represent Fallacracy?
 
Just seemed like a good idea at the time. Ben’s always been a very vocal supporter of my work and I’ve always wanted to combat my release of singles with something more substantial. I feel the Pegasia crowd already have that kind of foot in the door with my project and “Classics”, the body of work that has released on Pegasia is also so unique and independent that I felt it would be the perfect place for this release to settle down, among family one would say.
 
So, I’ll admit, I wasn’t sure if Fallacracy was a real word or not so I Googled it. The only hit I received was a link to your record. Define Fallacracy?
 
Hah, no it’s not a word. It’s a compound of the words Fallacy and Democracy, which I felt was very politically poignant. Micropoet Michael Chong defines fallacracy as when “…the matters of public interest are not debated but debased.” I think we do live in a Fallacracy, we are constantly lied to and distracted from issues that should be dealt with democratically, and the democratic process is often subverted through bribery and corporate control. I like the term, it feels too true, but of course this is art and all art is open to interpretation. One can either agree, or disagree, and elaborate. The things I say and do as an artist are not always meant as ultimate unavoidable truths, no one is infallible especially not in a Fallacracy.
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As the other half of the Altered Echo Project I’d like to extend the gratitude of both Aaron and myself to Proton for taking time out of his life to do this interview for us. Aaron and I would also like to extend out thanks to Mr. Ben Steed and the rest of the folks at Pegasia Music for letting us participate in the release in this way. All applicable links and contacts can be found below…
Proton42
Pegasia Music
AEP
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“The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.”

-Tim

AE

What’s Up 2015!?

In 2014 all three of us were overwhelmed with the response we got to the Altered Echo Project. What started as a will to release some good tunes on Rick’s part and the idea of an “endless remix” that I’d been kicking around for a while, AEP has become so much more, thanks to the artists and audience. To our artists, thank you so much for sharing your wonderful music with us all. Many thanks to anyone who listened, participated, or donated. To those of you who donated, an extra thank you! A significant portion of our modest operating cost for 2015 will be covered by listener donations.

In 2015 you will see the Altered Echo Project move on to “phase II” in which we attempt to fully realize the idea of an “endless remix”, a continual mutation of sounds. In 2015 we will release only material that relies heavily on the samples and files provided by our very generous artists from 2014. As always we are accepting anything from standard remixes to total sonic annihilation and anything that exists between. We will also be holding an open submission period for such material—details to come.

2015 will also see some other steps forward. In an effort to support the community that supported us, we will try and promote underground electronic musicians through a blog/promo series in which we interview artists about their new works and post that material on our website.

Our first feature spotlights the fantastic track “Discovery” by Burudu and Rikki Sho feat Amy Claire on vocals.

Be on the lookout in the next few days for an all new Artist Spotlight featuring Proton42 giving an in-depth discussion of his newest Pegasia release – Fallacracy. That will be shortly followed by an all new, full length release, formally ushering in Phase II, with a complete reinterpretation of our 8th release in the catalog AEP008 The Tide – Tidal.

And Please…

Don’t forget to like us on FaceBook and follow us on SoundCloud

Thanks again. Wishing you all the best in 2015.

Sincerely,

Aaron, Rick, Mike

 

Discovery Cover

“Discovery” by Rikki Sho and Burudu feat. Amy Claire

For me, “Discovery” is one of those tracks that I know I will continue to come back to, whether it be purposefully or by accident. I live in Ohio. And between harsh winters and nine months of gray days it can be quite depressing at times—I can imagine coming across this song some dark winter morning and being warmed and inspired by the swirling, uplifting melodies and vocals of this tune.

In an electronic music market saturated with short attention span songs this progressive epic is quite refreshing—this is a tune for daybreak and soft comedowns. At just one second over ten minutes, I am always surprised at how quickly I get lost in the narrative of the song: the pulsing interplay between soft kick drum and bubbling bass and the guitar and piano chords chasing Amy’s voice across the soundscape all make for a journey I want to go on over and over.

It is no surprise that this tune is the brain child of four artists—Nakul and Sahil of Burudu, Rikki Sho and vocalist Amy Claire—but how did they do it?

An Interview with the Artists

How did the four of you end up working together? Who approached whom?

Rikki: Burudu (Nakul & Sahil) and I had our own separate releases on a (now defunct) label – Red Light Café Recordings – in 2013.

I loved their release – a stunning single called Georgina – and asked if I could remix it. They agreed and were really pleased with the result. We kept in touch and followed each others work, and I really like their approach to their music so I figured we should work together again.

Burudu: The idea came about to work on a track and we just went with it, it was really organic , and after a lot of back and forth we had a solid song. Eventually the idea of adding vocals to the track came about, Rikki suggested Amy and we absolutely loved her voice.

Amy: Rikki and I are good friends and I have always been a great fan off his chilled out music. In fact it tends to calm me whenever I struggle to get to sleep.

Rikki: Having remembered Amy singing in a Christmas event once, I figured I’d approach her.

Did the four of you work together in person or was this mostly an online collaboration?

Burudu: We wish we did. We were never in the same place.

Rikki: Well I believe, by the time we began the collab, Nakul & Sahil had moved back to India, having been in London. So that side of the collab was all online. Swapping emails, Skype-ing and swapping files over WeTransfer.

Amy: Unfortunately I haven’t had the chance to meet Nakul and Sahil yet but heard their brilliant track when Rikki presented it to me. I have been recording acapella tracks and I believe Rikki introduced Burudu to my work. They were interested in including my vocals in the track they had created with Rikki.

Rikki: For Amy’s part, we spent 2 days (1 day per verse) at her flat, making-do with my little field recorder, some wine, and some chocolate.

Amy: So one night Rikki and I opened a bottle of wine to calm my nerves as I’m a novice at recording with others and used several methods to help my confidence which was wavering under the pressure. And I mean, I put pressure on myself when I make someone a cup of tea, so I’m going be nervous when I’m asked to add to something that is already beautiful. I really didn’t want to create something not worthy of the track. At one point I even made Rikki sit on the sofa with a cushion on his head for me.

The guys asked me to listen to the track and to create lyrics and a melody based on feelings that the music stirred up inside me. To me, it felt as though I was stressed and my mind filled with thoughts and worries. Worrying about how I can be myself in life when so much is expected of me. Where can I go to be allowed to be ‘ok’, ok with bad decisions I’ve made, ok with my funny quirks, ok to be my weight, ok to feel low. Then suddenly the music made me feel like I had walked into a golden corn field with the sun beating down on my skin. As I walked along I felt my fingers brush through the wheat completely releasing my anxiety. Knowing that troubles hadn’t gone, but in this place I could just be myself, whoever I want to be. Just BE.

I sketched down some of these words and very quickly in that one night it all came together. The lyrics written, melody created and my vocals recorded.

Since then Rikki has been liaising with Burudu on my behalf and between them they merged my vocals back into the track then emailed it over to me, which was very exciting.

What was the process like for each of you?

Rikki: Frickin’ awesome. The whole process, for me, feels like it has flowed 99% smoothly. Having learnt a bit about Burudu before the collab, knowing I liked their approach, I obviously made the right choice to collab with the guys. Each of us loved what the other did to the track each time; and our Skype chats were spent mostly agreeing with each other on what we wanted!! I was buzzing from their ideas! We obviously share the same Feels about music.

Nakul: The process was great, as mentioned earlier it was all very organic, nothing was forced and that’s when you really enjoy the process. We started working on this track sometime back and it took us a while to finish it, but keeping in mind that we had four of us sitting in four different parts of the world, I think we did alright.

Sahil: Rikki came along and added a bunch of instruments and sounds before Nakul finished the arrangement. It was all very spontaneous. There was quite a lot of sharing files between us. We thank WeTransfer entirely. It all started with guitars and the feel of the initial idea was quite different to the finished track.

Amy: This was just a new experience for me and very exciting. If I hadn’t been so nervous I believe I would have been able to produce smoother and more confident vocals but am very happy with the end result.

Rikki: The 2 days that formed Amy’s part were equally as awesome. I was literally bursting with excitement hearing what she was coming up with, but I had to keep calm so as not to disrupt her flow. But her flow was certainly flowing, even if her nerves made her think it wasn’t

What was the most important thing you learned from the collaboration?

Amy: So much, as this a new process for me every aspect of this journey has been eye opening and a learning curve for me. I have learnt to become more confident and that nerves only get in the way of success.

Rikki: That I can do collaborations after all, after having tried and failed in the past, mainly because I wanted what I wanted without having to compromise too much :) Recording vocals was also a new experience.

Nakul: Collaborations can be extremely inspiring, when one can witness different creative minds come together and create something, its always special. So yea I’ve learned that I quite enjoy collaborating with other artists.

Sahil: It was so fun. We’re going to be making more music together.

Was there any part of the process that put you out of your comfort zone? If so, what did you learn from that?

Amy: Oh yes, singing in front of others is something I have done before, but usually when singing covers of songs I have practiced and know the song inside out. I can then feel confident enough to play with the tune and vibrato to add a personal edge. However this is the first time since I was a child that I have tackled a vocal from scratch and I found it very difficult at first to sing in front of someone when the end product wasn’t polished.

Burudu: Nothing really put us out of our comfort zone. It was very chilled.

Rikki: No I don’t think so. Recording the vocals, although new, was exciting to do. I loved the whole process. It has been a fantastic experience.

Where did you draw your inspiration from for this track? (doesn’t necessarily have to be a musical source)

Rikki: I’m pretty “on the spot”, and often just go with what I feel at the time. Cheesy as it may sound, the track writes itself. Or the creativity leads me. Burudu’s love of emotion in music certainly inspired me after spending many years reluctantly accepting the notion that “emotion is cheesy”.

Burudu: Monkeys in the distance, drinking baileys, sunbathing.

Describe how you feel about the final product in a word or very short phrase.

Amy: Proud

Sahil: Open world

Nakul: A Journey

Rikki: RefreshedAndProud. There, that’s 1 word. :)

If you were going on national television to promote this track, what would you wear?

Sahil: Definitely socks.

Nakul: A heart-rate monitor.

Amy: Skinny jeans, a vest top and hoodie unless its somewhere warm, then I’d ‘feminize’ and wear a maxi dress and flip flops.

Rikki: Nothing. Clothes suck. But in case anyone has issues with that, an all black costume with LED lights patterned all over it. But not crazy flashing ones. Ones that gently phase in and out. It’s a chill track, and I am all about the full sensory experience.

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As one half of the Altered Echo Project I’d like to extend the gratitude of both Rick and myself to Amy, Rikki, Nakul and Sahil for taking time out of their lives to do this interview for us. The artists can be reached via the electronic means listed below.

The track is available on both BandCamp and SoundCloud

Amy Claire:

Sound Cloud: https://soundcloud.com/amyclairevocals

Facebook: www.facebook.com/amyclairevocals

Twitter: @AmyClaireVocals

Burudu:

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/burudu

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/buruduofficial

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Burudumusic

Instagram: http://instagram.com/burudumusic

Rikki:

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/rikkisho

Artist Home Page: http://rikkisho.wix.com/rikki-sho-music

The Altered Echo Project…
is honored to present – AEP11: Mimetik – Handmade Songs for Handmade People

Out Now

It’s the release we’ve been waiting on since before we began and our final release of 2014…

Handmade Songs for Handmade People

Hinting at past offerings, Handmade Songs is a nine track a collection of works that totally stand on their own yet somehow remains very true to the artists form. Don’t expect Paths, don’t expect Dead Man, but expect something honest that will reach you in whatever place in life that you find yourself sitting now.

All tracks mixed & composed by Mimetik
Mastered by Mike Watts
Published by Aaron Smith and Rick Jeldy via the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution License

Cover Photo by Filippo Brandini
Cover Layout by Mimetik

Stems & Samples Done Differently…

As with all our previous releases we are making avaliable samples intended for manipulation in original works based upon this material. However, this time it’s a bit different. Mimetikhas agreed to provide you, our listener turned artist, with output data from Reaktor and PD patches that were used in the creation of this release. The use of the audio in this way brings new opportunities for original works to be born from the old and submitted back to us for possible republication via this project. Clicking the banner below will start a download of this unique and additional release content…

bannerlight

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The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank Mimetik for providing us with this fabulous material, and Mike Watts for the AMAZING masters. We’d also like to thankYOU the listener for checking out the project and participating in what we have created.

AEP-

DotCom
SoundCloud
BandCamp
FaceBook

Mimetik -

SoundCloud
Blog: Coding, Sounds & Colors
On Xylem Records
On The IDMf Netlabel

The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.

-Tim

Preview – It’s A Long Distance From Here To Eternity

Taking off the Mask…

Thinking of the way to best present our final release of 2014 has been on my mind for quite a while now. Normally it’s a piece with fancy verbiage, imagery, ambiguous terms, and a little bit of hype. For our eleventh offering in the AEP catalog I’ve decided to go another way…

I formally met Mimetik in June of 2012 just prior to his debut release on the IDMf NetalbelIDMf037: Paths. Truth be told I knew him before that formal meeting but I knew him not as Mimitek but as one who called himself unknown__artist. What I quickly picked up in the conversation he and I had was here is a man who is truly passionate, not only about making music, but a man who is equally passionate about experimentation within the realm.

Shortly thereafter Paths was released and my perspective on what music should be totally changed…

It’s not very often that something like that can change you in some way and ever since I’ve been chasing every bit of his music I can find, and fighting the urge of trying to recreate what he does in my work, and calling it my own.

Aaron and I began preparing for the launch of the Altered Echo Project just a little shy of two years ago to the day I sit here typing this. The first artist we contacted about doing a release through the project was Mimetik and nearly a year would pass until I received a reply. The reply revealed a man invested in his art to the extent of isolation and the reply also revealed a man committed to not just doing more of the same…

I could easily make Paths II” is what he said, but that was something by which he was unwilling to abide. Paths II, oddly enough, was exactly what I was wanting. In stark contrast to the bright glitchy rhythms found in the record I have listened to more than any other since it’s release, his answer came in the form of I Am a Dead Man which was released on Xylem Records 15 July, 2013.

Once again the Altered Echo Project would remain to wait…

Roughly two years after Paths release, two years after the beginnings of AEP, and a little over a year off Dead Man’s heels, the wait is finally over. Coming to you October 28th, 2014 is the release we’ve been waiting on since the projects inception. It’s music that represents yet another evolution in the life of an artist, aptly titled…

Handmade Songs for Handmade People
Out October 28th, 2014

Hinting at past offerings, Handmade Songs is a nine track a collection of works that totally stand on their own yet somehow remains very true to the artists form. Don’t expect Paths, don’t expect Dead Man, but expect something honest that will reach you in whatever place in life that you find yourself sitting now.

Tracklisting -

1. Replacing Words With Empty Dreams
2. Kaleidospop
3. A Bird From Tristinika
4. What I Feel Is What You Get
5. It Is A Long Distance From Here To Eternity
6. Fragment 03
7. Leave Me Here
8. We Will Meet Yesterday Despite The Time Difficulties
9. Laplace’s Dream (A Counter-Revolution Is A Contrary Revolution)

All tracks mixed & composed by Mimetik
Mastered by Mike Watts
Published by Aaron Smith and Rick Jeldy via the Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution License

Cover Photo by Filippo Brandini

Layout by Mimetik


Stems & Samples Done Differently…

As with all our previous releases samples intended for manipulation in original works based upon this material will be provided. However this time it’s a bit different. Mimetik has agreed to provide you, our listener turned artist, with output data from Reaktor and PD patches that were used in the creation of this release. The use of the audio in this way brings new opportunities for original works to be born from the old and submitted back to us for possible republication via this project.

———–

The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank Mimetik for providing us with this fabulous material, and Mike Watts for the AMAZING masters. We’d also like to thank YOU the listener for checking out the project and participating in what we have created.

AEP-

DotCom
SoundCloud
BandCamp
FaceBook

Mimetik -

SoundCloud
Blog: Coding, Sounds & Colors
On Xylem Records
On The IDMf Netlabel

The clue is in the name. Go get it, listen, get the stems, make a remix.

-Tim

The Altered Echo Project in partnership with In Space and Time Records
are honored to present…

All tracks are mutations / re-interpretations of A Product of my Environment as composed by Jazzyspoon and released by In Space and Time Records.

- Tracklisting –

1 – A sum of the Product – Phomorian
2 – Daydreamwalkers – Vlantis Mutation
3 – Long Trip Home – Neuroscientist Mutation
4 – Bigger pictures – Neu KatalYst Mutation
5 – The Long Trip Home – c.db.sn Emotional Weight Mix
6 – Daydreamwalkers – Ambient Mechanics Mutation
7 – BPRMX – BiggerPictures.Mutate – RFJ
8 – The Long Trip Home – Ambient Mechanics Mutation
9 – What Happens in Waves – No Floors Mutation
10 – What Happens in Wavs – Grain Bastard Rips Them Open to See Mix
11- Daydreamwalkers – Your City Sleeps Mutation
12- Long Trip Home – OCD Soundsystm Mutation
13- revLOVEr – Remco H. Mutation
14- The Great North Wet – Sapling Mutation
15- The Great North Wet – Catnip and Claws Mutation
16 – The Long Trip Home – Nightdewller Mutation
17 – It’s All In My Head – IG88 Mutation

Mutated works mastered by Mike Watts
Published by Aaron Smith & Rick Jeldy in partnership with In Space and Time Records via the Altered Echo Project

- Artwork -

Br/ainfu+ked
Numerical
ndewlla
Cyclops
Jazzyspoon

***

The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank Brandon K. Morris, Wayne Baker, and all the other heads at In Space & Time for giving us the opportunity to take this wonderful material one step further. Continued thanks to Mike Watts for the AMAZING MASTERS and really taking what we have to another level.

We’d also like to thank the enormous list of artists that participated in this release, and submitted works for consideration, without who none of this would have been possible.

***

Don’t forget to check out our tenth single artist release in the AEP catalog
AEP010 – Dataf1ow – All At Once

And finally…

Thanks be to Jason Potorff aka Jazzyspoon for putting together this top shelf material and so graciously providing to the community in this way so as to facilitate this stunning collection of mutated works.

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AEP
DotComFaceBookSoundCloudBandCamp

ISAT

DotComFaceBookSoundCloudBandCamp

JazzySpoon

DotComSoundCloudBandCamp

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ISAT2

“The clue is in the name. Go get it. Listen. Get the stems. Make a remix.”

-Tim

The Altered Echo Project in partnership with In Space and Time Records
are honored to announce…

**Out 09-12-14**

All tracks are mutations / re-interpretations of A Product of my Environment as composed by Jazzyspoon and released by In Space and Time Records.

-Preview-

1. A Sum of the Product – Phomorian

- Tracklisting -

1 – A sum of the Product – Phomorian
2 – Daydreamwalkers – Vlantis Remix
3 – Long Trip Home – Neuroscientist Remix
4 – Bigger pictures – Neu KatalYst Remix
5 – BPRMX – Bigger Pictures.Mutate – RFJ
6 – Daydreamwalkers (Ambient Mechanics)
7 – The Long Trip Home – c.db.sn emotional weight mix
8 – The Long Trip Home (ambient Mechanics)
9 – What Happens in Waves (No Floors Remix)
10 – What Happens in Wavs (grain Bastard rips them open to see mix)
11- Daydreamwalkers – Your City Sleeps
12- Long Trip Home – OCD Soundsystm
13- revLOVEr – Remco H.
14- The Great North Wet – Sapling
15- The Great North Wet – Catnip and Claws
16 – The Long Trip Home – Nightdewller Mutation
17 – It’s All In My Head – IG88 Remix

Mutated works mastered by Mike Watts
Published by Aaron Smith & Rick Jeldy in partnership with In Space and Time Records via the Altered Echo Project

- Artwork -

Br/ainfu+ked
Numerical
ndewlla
Cyclops
Jazzyspoon

***

The Altered Echo Project wishes to thank Brandon K. Morris, Wayne Baker, and all the other heads at In Space & Time for giving us the opportunity to take this wonderful material one step further. Continued thanks to Mike Watts for the AMAZING MASTERS and really taking what we have to another level.

We’d also like to thank the enormous list of artists that participated in this release, and submitted works for consideration, without who none of this would have been possible.

- In the Meantime -

Don’t forget to check out our tenth single artist release in the AEP catalog
AEP010 – Dataf1ow – All At Once

And finally…

Thanks be to Jason Potorff aka Jazzyspoon for putting together this top shelf material and so graciously providing to the community in this way so as to facilitate this stunning collection of mutated works.

***

AEP
DotComFaceBookSoundCloudBandCamp

ISAT

DotComFaceBookSoundCloudBandCamp

JazzySpoon

DotComSoundCloudBandCamp

***

ISAT2

AE

“The clue is in the name. Go get it. Listen. Get the stems. Make a remix.”

-Tim

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